One of the ways that hackers gain access to valuable information is to eavesdrop on internet connections. It's important to know if you're secure.

You are watching: You are about to leave a secure internet connection


My computer occasionally tells me that you are about to leave a secureinternet connection. It would be possible for others to view information yousend. What does this mean.


Most of the time it’s an informational message that you can safely ignore.However there are times that it’s critically important to know what it means,and whether or not you should be doing something differently.

The issue?

Someone could be eavesdropping.


In computing, a network is simply a collection of computers and digital devices continuously interconnected in such a way that they can exchange data.(Click on the term for full definition.)
">network and how you’re connected to the internet, allcomputers “close to” each other can actually “see” the network traffic of allthe others. For example you could be doing some on-line banking using onecomputer in your home, but all the data traveling between your computer andyour bank could be viewed by another computer in your home. Othercomputers typically don’t listen in, because it’s clear that the datais destined for your computer and not another, but software exists that canignore that.


Sniffing is a term used to describe eavesdropping on network communications.Typically communications between one computer and another – particularly via the internet – travel across several different devices that are also shared with other devices and computers. Depending on how those devices are configured, it may be possible for a communication traveling across that device to be “seen” by other devices not actually involved in the conversation. The most common example is an open Wifi hotspot, where all wireless communications between computers and the hotspot itself can be seen by any other computer capable of wireless communication within its range.The best analogy might be listening in on a conversation happening between two people near you.Sniffing can be protected against in several ways, but the most reliable and common is to encrypt the conversation. The data might still be sniffed, but because it has been encrypted, it cannot be understood by anyone other than the parties actually involved in the conversation.Think of it as those two people near you speaking in a foreign language, or a language known only to them – you can hear the conversation, but you have no idea whatsoever what’s being said.(Click on the term for full definition.)
">Sniffing” software can monitor the data going to and from other computerson the network. This kind of
Sniffing is a term used to describe eavesdropping on network communications.Typically communications between one computer and another – particularly via the internet – travel across several different devices that are also shared with other devices and computers. Depending on how those devices are configured, it may be possible for a communication traveling across that device to be “seen” by other devices not actually involved in the conversation. The most common example is an open Wifi hotspot, where all wireless communications between computers and the hotspot itself can be seen by any other computer capable of wireless communication within its range.The best analogy might be listening in on a conversation happening between two people near you.Sniffing can be protected against in several ways, but the most reliable and common is to encrypt the conversation. The data might still be sniffed, but because it has been encrypted, it cannot be understood by anyone other than the parties actually involved in the conversation.Think of it as those two people near you speaking in a foreign language, or a language known only to them – you can hear the conversation, but you have no idea whatsoever what’s being said.(Click on the term for full definition.)
">sniffing is particularly easy in
Wifi, or more correctly Wi-Fi™, is a wireless radio signalling protocol that defines a way for data – typically ethernet data packets – to be transmitted wirelessly between devices.We tend to think of Wi-Fi primarily as a means for connecting a computer with a Wi-Fi adapter to a network by means of a Wi-Fi access point, often included as part of a wireless router, connected to the internet.Wi-Fi refers to specific standards, typically a variation of 802.11 a, b, g, or n.Most consumer-grade Wi-Fi equipment has a range of a few hundred feet, and thus Wi-Fi is considered a short-distance signalling protocol.(Click on the term for full definition.)
">WiFi hotspots.When network traffic is wireless, any computer within range of the signal canlisten in.

It’s kind of like being in a restaurant and listening to the conversation atthe table next to you. It’s not meant for you, but it’s very easy to eavesdropand listen in.


“It’s kind of like being in a restaurant and listeningto the conversation at the table next to you.”

A “secure” internet connection is one where the data being sent back andforth is encrypted. Only the machine it’s destined for knows how to decrypt andread the information.

This is kind of like being back in that same restaurant and listening in,only this time you can’t understand a word of what’s being said because they’respeaking a completely different language. You can listen all you want, it justwon’t do you any good. Only the two people speaking to each other understandtheir own language.

“https” connections are encrypted, secure internet connections. “http”connections are not. “http” connections can be sniffed and understood; “https”connections can also be sniffed but the data visible is unintelligible.

In some cases when you’re on a page that you visited using an “https”connection, and you click a link that is going to go to a “http” connection,your browser will warn you, and that’s the message you’re seeing. The issue isthat you’re leaving a secure connection (https) for an insecure one (http). Ifthe browser didn’t warn you it might be easy to miss the fact that this hadhappened and think that you were browsing securely when you weren’t.

It’s not at all uncommon to transition from websites accessed by “https” tothose accessed with plain “http”. “https” is actually a tad slower, and not allinformation needs to be transmitted securely. There’s no reason, for example,to encrypt the contents of this page, and so there’s no“https://ask-leo.com”. However sites that require security,such as banking or other sensitive services, may be available only via“https”.

Linking from one to another is common. The warning is simply that, awarning, so that you know just how secure you are.


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How Do I Protect Myself from Other Computers on My Local Network? - Many households have computers used for sensitive things sharing a network with less trustworthy users. Here's how to increase your security.
Posted: September 24, 2007 in: ask-leo.comShortlink: https://nlinux.org/3158